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Category Archives: robots

Mission to Jupiter

In the words of the great Gordon Murray “Lastfm-bot is a robot, a musical robot, wound up and ready to play.”

Sadly, we don’t let him play, we send him out to work. Lastfm-bot’s job is to find gigs for you loyal flookers. He scurries off into the night, wearing his little robotic hipster sunglasses and drainpipe trousers and makes beautiful purple event cards. He seals each one with a little robotic kiss* and then puts them into flook for your sonic empleasurement.

* don’t ask.

Gosh, this quite slipped my mind. Must have been all the excitement of the nuns. So, you should have in your AppStore right now a super spanky new update to flook – searchbot.

Here he is all happy, shiny and yellow.

The first thing you’ll notice about him is that he is very friendly indeed. The second thing is that he has three eyes – that’s two more that you if you are a cyclops. It also means he’s very good at looking for things.

Tapping on him lets you filter the cards you see nearby in oh-so-many-ways. You can filter by category, user or even just text. So you could for example search for all the cards Ronaldo has made about “Killer Robots destorying London”

Sadly there aren’t any but you get the idea. Try searching for hashtags like #LDNEP to see all of cpchannel’s elephant cards.

We’re really pleased with how this functionality works – you can get back to a card you saw earlier really easily and use it to tweet or post to facebook. You can filter the type of stuff you want to see nearby – say you’ve already eaten but want to find an event to go to. Or maybe, you saw one of Sam’s cards and want to see everything she’s done before you follow her.

Flook with added search™ is available on the app store – right this instant!

Who said flook never did anything for you? Nobody said that because we do loads for you. We tame robots to bring you cool stuff, we give away software and we write stupid letters to people.

Still, that’s not enough. We wnted to go the extra kilomile and so we’re now offering two for one tickets to Sister Act right here in the West End of London. All you need to do is get flook, use the spanky new search functionality and find the ‘Sister Act’  flook card. It’ll tell you what to do from there. Or, you could just head over to our special web page which says the same thing with added pictures.

Here’s a picture of a nun to whet your appetite:

In a stunning piece of non-news, the BBC recently reported that “armed robots will not be allowed to roam the home of the future randomly stabbing people”.

We for one think this is a shame but the experiment sounds like it was fun:

The tests involved a robot arm weighing 14kg and a 1.1m reach that was equipped with a variety of bladed household tools including a steak knife, kitchen knife, scissors and screwdriver.

The robot arm was programmed to use the bladed tools to stab and cut a silicone lump, a leg from a dead pig and the arm of a human volunteer.

Here in the UK, it is election day. We have been presented with a choice of:

Unlike Elephants, robots aren’t allowed to vote or even express political views. If they were we’d vote for Mr Clegg because none of the parties have clearly defined policies on equality for robotos but at least Mr Clegg’s shorts are the same colour as flook’s “Near Me” tab.

The important thing though is that you vote. If you don’t know who to vote for, try VoteMatch. If you don’t know how to vote you should probably start here to practice.

If you’ve run flook in the last few days you’ll probably have noticed some cards by the all-seeing nextstop-bot.

nextstop-bot knows about lots and lots of stuff. He’s the emissery to flook from a mysterious and far-away* hive mind who have been cataloguing the earth in all of its goodness for some time.

Nextstop-bot guards his secrets well and so you can’t see them on the flook.it website, only the iPhone client.

* actually, they’re just down the road in SoMa.

A robot must obey the orders given to it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.

The Second Law of Robotics